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About BPA Safety

Bisphenol A (BPA) is used as the basic building block (intermediate) to make plastics and resins
which are essential to many consumer and industrial products used in modern living, including
many applications important to public health and food safety. BPA is one of the most thoroughly
tested chemicals used today and has a safety track record of 50 years.
APPROVED FOR SAFE USE IN FOOD CONTACT
BPA is commonly used to make polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins, both of which have been
approved by the European Commission and its scientific expert agency, the European Food Safety
Authority (EFSA), by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and numerous other government
agencies worldwide, for use in food-contact applications:
Polycarbonate plastic: This lightweight, shatter-resistant plastic provides a clear view of food in
durable and temperature-resistant storage containers that help keep food fresh.
Epoxy resins: By protecting food from contamination and spoilage, cans with epoxy resin linings
have a shelf life of two years or longer, which is essential for feeding large numbers of people in
disaster-relief and military operations. Food banks, economically disadvantaged families, and
many others benefit from the extended shelf-life of canned foods made possible by BPA.
UNIQUE BENEFITS FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND INDUSTRIAL USES
Polycarbonate plastic provides strength and shatter-resistant qualities which are beneficial for
bicycle helmets, cell phones, safety glasses, CDs, and many other products. Its high thermostability
and clarity also meets the demanding hygiene requirements for use in live-saving medical
devices made from polycarbonate. Epoxy resins characteristics make them ideal for a wide range
of consumer products including printed circuit boards, paints, windmill blades, and protective
coatings in pipes and tanks.
CONSUMER EXPOSURE IS EXTREMELY LOW
A consumer weighing 60kg would have to ingest more than 300 l of water from a polycarbonate
water dispenser, every day of his/her entire life, only to reach the level established as safe by
EFSA. Consumer exposure to BPA from all sources is minute and well below safety standards set
by government regulatory agencies around the world. Extensive data from bio monitoring studies
show that typical human exposure to BPA from all sources is clearly below the safe intake level set
by EFSA at 4 microgram/kg body weight/day

BPA SAFETY IS CONFIRMED BY GOVERNMENT SCIENTISTS
The consensus of major government agencies around the world is that BPA is
safe for use in food-contact applications. Scientists advising those bodies have
stated in their assessments that exposure levels to BPA are many times lower than
government-set safety levels.
In January 2015, following a comprehensive re-evaluation of BPA exposure
and toxicity, EFSA’s scientific experts concluded that „BPA poses no health
risk to consumers of any age group [including unborn children, infants
and adolescents] at current exposure levels. Going beyond previous
assessments, EFSA evaluated exposure to BPA not only from food, but also
from a range of other potential sources. EFSA found that exposure to BPA from
all sources is very low and well below the new safe limit of 4 microgram/kg body
weight per day.
In February 2015, the BfR supported the EFSA assessment of BPA and states „no health risk for
consumers from BPA esposure“.
In November 2014, the US FDA updated its assessment of BPA. The FDA’s current perspective,
based on its most recent safety assessment, is that BPA is safe at the current levels occurring
in food. In another recent update, the FDA answered the question „Is BPA safe?“ with a clear
answer: „Yes.“
In April 2013, Food Standards Australia and New Zealand (FSANZ) reaffirmed the safety of BPA
and stated: „The weight of the scientific evidence indicates that exposure to BPA in food does
not present a significant human health and safety issue at current exposure levels.“
COMPREHENSIVE STUDIES SUPPORT THE SAFETY OF BPA
Government regulatory agencies have declared that BPA is safe as used in many applications,
including food contact applications. These conclusions are based on numerous scientific studies
and are supported by other scientific organisations. None of the many hundreds of studies on
BPA has shown a direct cause-and-effect relationship between BPA and any human health effect.
Numerous scientific studies show that the very small amount of BPA that may be ingested by a
person during normal daily activity is efficiently converted to biologically inactive metabolites,
which are eliminated from the human body within 24 hours. The German Society of Toxicology,
upon evaluation of the scientific data, reached conclusions very similar to the many government
agencies that have reviewed the science on BPA, specifically that “the available evidence indicates
that BPA exposure represents no noteworthy risk to the health of the human population, including
newborns and babies.”

More information on BPA
is available at the following
Web sites:
EFSA:
https://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/
efsajournal/pub/3978
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/
doi/10.2903/j.efsa.2015.3978/full
www.efsa.europa.eu/en/topics/
topic/bisphenol.htm
http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/
press/news/150121
BfR:
http://www.bfr.bund.de/cm/343/
kein-gesundheitsrisiko-fuerverbraucher-durch-bisphenola-exposition-bfr-unterstuetztdie-einschaetzung-der-efsaneubewertung.pdf
FSANZ:
http://www.foodstandards.gov.
au/science/surveillance/pages/
fsanzsurveyandactivi4978.aspx
FDA:
http://www.fda.gov/Food/
IngredientsPackagingLabeling/
FoodAdditivesIngredients/
ucm355155.htm
PlasticsEurope:
www.bisphenol-A-Europe.org
Or by contacting:
Jasmin Bird
Polycarbonate/Bisphenol-A Group
PlasticsEurope
Email:
Jasmin.Bird.consultant@plasticseurope.org